Review Yamaha PSRE360 61-Key Touch Sensitive Portable Keyboard

Review of Yamaha PSRE360 61-Key Touch Sensitive Portable Keyboard with Power Supply, Dark Walnut

Excellent keyboard for family wanting to invest in lighter piano and not go out to the expense of a weighted keyboard.

This has just come out on the NAMM Yamaha 2019 release-“Yamaha today debuted the PSR-E360 portable personal keyboard. Featuring top-quality Yamaha Voices of all types, interactive accompaniment Styles that let the player be a one-person band, and educational features to keep new players interested, the PSR-E360 comes in two attractive wood grain finishes that can be proudly displayed alongside any home décor.” read more here

Yamaha PSR-E363 synthesizer.

This is a novelty and besides a new design, the main difference from the Yamaha 353 model is the more powerful acoustic system, enhanced polyphony (48 voices), and the most important feature is a built-in audio interface.

So you can send not only MIDI notes but also an audio signal via computer to record your track. And also it has an updated sound library.

Unlike the Yamaha 263 model, this instrument is equipped with a touch- responsive keyboard. Let’s test this sensitivity using the piano sound. The electric piano sound. The organ. The acoustic guitar sound and accompaniment. The bass guitar sound and auto accompaniment.

This instrument has a keyboard splitting: now the bass is in my left hand and piano in the right hand. The synth sound and auto accompaniment. Let’s examine how the auto accompaniment function works

We’ve chosen the violin sound, turn on the keys and the auto accompaniment function has to be necessarily active. Let’s set the chord we need. And the harmony of the right-hand melody starts to play based on this chord.

The arpeggiator sounds

In general, you can apply each sound to each arpeggiator mode. Let’s try and listen to some variants. And so on.

So you can play this instrument in a duo mode, not a single sound, you can mix two different sounds.

Let’s activate the duo mode. You can choose several reverberation modes for each sound while playing this instrument. This function is inactive now. Let’s listen to how it sounds. Turn it on and listen to some variants. And so on. This instrument has magnificent songs, which you can use for learning.

And Yamaha placed notes of these compositions on their website. While listening to the track, you can see, which notes are being pressed on the keyboard that placed both on the display and on the staff. You can pause at any time or rewind the needed moment.

The rear panel has a sustain pedal jack, headphone and amplifier output, AUX-in, USB for computer connecting and power supply connector.

The power supply is included…

Learning Piano Keyboards for Beginners|What to Buy for Lessons -Piano

Learning Piano Keyboards for Beginners.


So what piano is best for a beginner? This is a question that we’re asked almost every single day here online on Pinaolessonbeginner.com.

And the answer tends to come down the three factors.

1. The first the most obvious of which is what is your budget

2. The second one is how much room do you have in your home.

3. But the third one is a new in the age of digital pianos and keyboards and that is, how do you want the learn the play the piano.

what piano to buy for a beginner

Now what do I mean by that exactly. Well there are keyboards rather like this one down here that will play just like a traditional piano the Yamaha P125 88 keys 22kg or Yamaha P115 .You turn it on and it gives you a straight forward piano sound.

Now that is great if you want the learn in the traditional way, that’s because it operates just like traditional pianos.

But there are also versions like this one up here and this one over here as you can see they’ve got lots of buttons on them and a big screen as well.

Beginner Keyboard Popular with Children

Now. These are designed the make learning a little more interesting and exciting because they’ll show you music on those big screens and they’ll play backing tracks for example you can play in a band or an orchestra and just play the music part. There’s even a model where the keys themselves light up Casio LK -175 l and play along with you those are hugely popular with children as you might expect.

I love it! This is my first keyboard Customer said

I love it! This is my first keyboard, and I am a beginner, so I have
nothing the compare it the. However, I do enjoy playing it, I try the
practice every day and sounds great, but I am glad I bought the keyboard
stickers and how the play for absolute beginners. The manuals it comes
with were not as user-friendly. I am very happy with my purchase and I
believe they worked on the problems from the last model which was great.
Before I bought this I read as many reviews as I can and one of the
complaints from the previous model was the stand. The stand with mine
works great, no problems, stable and easy the adjust. I appreciate that
they listened the the customers.

So consider how you want the learn the play. It’s a very personal thing I think some people get on much better some children get on much better when it’s very focused and they’re no distractions.

But, if there are things that will play along with you and be a bit more engaging like these. Then you can actually end up playing with a group Orchestra. Having that feeling of performing in the group and Orchestra and without an extensive learning process which some people is really fantastic.

Now, let’s say you’re in that first category traditional way of learning and your budget for your first piano is about a thousand dollars.

Have a look at these models Yamaha Mid level Piagerro 76 keys NP-32,

  • Yamaha’s Advanced Wave Memory Stereo Sampling
  • Graded Soft Touch action in a space-saving 76-note keyboard
  • 64-note polyphony
  • Half-damper control with optional FC3A pedal
  • Built-in speakers

Yamaha P-45 these are not piano weighted keys

  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low end and lighter in the high end, just like an acoustic piano
  • Advanced Wave Memory Stereo Sampling recreates natural instrument sound in stereo
  • 64-note polyphony allows the player the perform moderately dense piano passages, even using heavy sustain pedal, with few or no dropped notes being cut off
  • Dual Mode lets you combine two Voices together, like piano and strings, for an inspiring new playing experience
  • The USB the HOST port allows you the connect and interact with a wide variety of educational, music creation or music entertainment applications on a computer or mobile device

And then the

Yamaha P115 is 88 weighted piano keys and is very popular.

  • The Pure CF Sound Engine faithfully reproduces the tone of a meticulously sampled Yamaha’s acclaimed 9′ CFIIIS concert grand piano, allowing for incredibly dynamic and expressive playing
  • GHS weighted 88-key action is heavier in the low end and lighter in the high end, just like an acoustic piano
  • Pianist Styles turn your simple chords into exciting accompaniment. Play a chord and the Pianist Style gives you a full piano accompaniment
  • Drum Rhythms are great the perform with and also put the fun back into practicing as they are a practical alternative the a metronome
  • The Controller App for iOS devices adds a rich, graphic user interface allowing for quick and easy navigation and configuration

If you’re in the category where you want something that’s a bit more exciting a bit more engaging have a look at these models because they again been our most popular ones

Yamaha PSRE353,

  • Touch-sensitive keys add dynamics to your playing. Play lightly and the sound is soft. Hit the key hard and it’s loud.
  • The Aux Line Input allows you to connect any music device with a headphone output, such as an MP3 player, a computer, a mixer or even another keyboard, and hear it through the internal speakers.
  • Melody Suppressor isolates the melody of audio songs connected to the Aux Line Input jack and reduces the volume allowing you to sing along or play the lead.
  • Yamaha Education Suite (Y.E.S.) allows you to practice using the preset songs (or MIDI files on compatible instruments) at your own pace, one hand at a time, or both together.

Yamaha PSRE 400,

  • Two Assignable Live Control Knobs are designed for real-time manipulation of various effects.
  • With a larger and higher-quality selection of instrument Voices than the General MIDI (GM) standard Voice library, the XG Lite library makes XG MIDI songs sound just that much better.
  • With 48-note polyphony players will benefit from fewer dropped notes and more expressive control than they would with a lower note count.
  • The PSR-EW400 features audio transfer through the USB to Host port. You can digitally record your performance to your computer or iOS device.
  • Use the speakers of your instrument to listen to the audio playback of your portable music player, iOS device, mixer, or computer via the 1/8″ AUX input.

 

Yamaha DGX-660

  • World class concert grand piano sound with Pure CF Sampling
  • Easy to read score and lyric display
  • An authentic piano touch with an 88-note weighted GHS Keyboard
  • USB Audio Recording/Playback
  • A truer sound with Damper Resonance

 

Hey Everyone, My name is Micah Blake And in This lesson we are going to be looking at what keyboard you should buy your kids for lessons .

This one like I said we are going to be going over three different styles of pianos That will be good for beginners but first off lets look at some “Piano Lies”

Lie number 1 In order to be a good student you need to have a real piano Not a keyboard.

This is like Hogwash.

Unless your training your five year old to be like the next concert pianist and they need to have the best to begin with to become the best well that’s your philosophy and you probably wouldn’t be watching this video right now.

I had kids learn on tablets. Like literally on an iPad. Now that’s not the best thing in the world but they were learning.

They were taking lessons and they were learning on their tablet.

If that’s what you have then that’s what you work with I have some really cheap keyboards here that are $200 and under which is cheaper than an iPad

But like I said you, don’t need a real piano to do this.

Another thing people like to say is “The really important thing is you have to have weighted keys” So that it feels like a real piano This is another joke.

You don’t have to have weighted keys In my opinion I don’t even like to play with weighted keys, I played with them for twenty years.

And certain songs are actually harder for me to play with weighted keys than not weighted keys.

This really just depends on your preference. It’s a lot cheaper to buy then without weighted keys so if your student or your kids is just starting out It’s cheaper to get in without that, and if they enjoy that it’s going to be cheaper there whole life to get good instruments like that. It’s definitely not a requirement

Now the other people, a lot of people say “It’s important to get something with 88 keys, thats a full keyboard” Now if your kids is starting out in lessons, It will probably be like years before they need the full keys.And even this is my keyboard that I use it is a KORG KROME This is more expensive than what I will be showing you.

But this is what I use professionally when I record, And when I play live and it only has 61 keys .

It does have an octave button so I can bump all the keys lower and play lower if I need to, but I don’t need all that all of the time. I’m typically playing with a band I’m not playing the full spectrum because I don’t need to, the bass player is playing the bass or they aren’t I bump it down and then I am playing the bass. I don’t need to play everything all the time and your student definitely isn’t going to be. They are going to be working in this section. That many keys for like a year. You don’t have to go out and spend the extra money for the extra weight, to take up the extra space to have this huge keyboard in your house.

Totally Unnecessary. Another thing is “Do you need Speakers” Really nice speakers that sound like a real piano. Now no you don’t some of these some of these keyboards have really awesome sounds in them. And typically your kids will actually enjoy having headphones on. They can play all the really annoying sounds all the time that you won’t actually want them to play with speakers. They are going to have fun playing on there own so if it’s just headphones it’s probably fine. You can always plug it into other stuff

Now those are the main lies Like I said. So what are some of the main components I am going to look for?

The first one The #1 for me is Touch Sensitivity Now if you are looking online Just google in the comments or something and ask a question “Does this have touch Sensitivity” usually that is something that people have commented on.

They will say Oh ya that’s great or they will say no it doesn’t have it on this one. I think this is a requirement, because it makes such a big difference on how you play. Now what touch sensitivity  a normal keyboard that doesn’t have it, If I play it soft It will sound like I’m playing it the same way. If I play it hard or soft it will sound exactly the same.

That’s Really Really annoying, because you’re not developing a good touch.

And then if it has touch sensitivity it will sound soft When I play soft or loud when I play loud. And that makes a huge difference on how you play piano and how it sounds to people. That would be my number one.

The other differences that will come into play are those other things we talked about. Does it have enough number of keys? I would have at least 61, because usually anything below that usually the quality of the instrument goes down, because real musicians aren’t using it. It’s not because it’s 61 keys that you need it but if it’s less than that it’s usually a toy and not an instrument.

Weighted keys if that’s a really big deal to you and then What perks does it have? What I mean by that is does it come with a stand.

Does it come with a pedal?

Does it have instruments they can play with?

Sometimes it comes with an app they can actually learn songs off of it.

All of these things are a big deal if that’s something you really need .

So if you’re interested in this we are going to jump right in and look at 3 different keyboards that you can find on amazon for about $200 or under I hope this helps you out buying your instrument for your kid

This is the Alesis Recital 88 Key Beginner Digital Keyboard .Now this one is your full size keyboard. It has the full 88 keys over the full thing here. It also has semi weighted keys. Which means it’s not full “hammer Action” Like a real piano would be. But it does have some weight to the keys. So if that is a big deal for you, I know it’s not typically a big deal for most people. But the biggest part of this keyboard is just that That it has your full weighted keys most of your sounds and stuff will be pretty basic but sounds good and especially if you are getting into classical music or anything like this.This would be an excellent choice for you.

This next keyboard that I have for you Is a Casio CTK- 2550 61  keyboard .Now the reason I have this on here is This is the updated version of the actual keyboard that I started out with. I loved this keyboard it has a ton of fun stuff but it’s all pretty basic like 100 different sound 100 different songs you could play along with. This one though unlike my other one has touch sensitivity which is awesome and see right here it has app integration which means you can plug into their app and do all kinds of cool stuff. This would be like a very basic keyboard That will have more fun elements than the other one. It will sound good and it will have everything that your kid your student will need to actually get started playing music.

And it’s half the price of the other one. Now this is the Hamzer 61 Key portable Keyboard Now the cool thing about this one, it has all those little extra accessories. We have a stand headphones That’s awesome for you parents Microphone that plugs into the back of the piano, so it will play through the speakers like karaoke and it has a stand and your seat .All of those things are very awesome and it’s only 10 dollars more than the Casio I haven’t personally played this one. But from those I do know who have it doesn’t have quite as good speakers as the casio. But if you are playing through the headphones anytime it sounds pretty good. This is a practice keyboard it’s not something you are going to be playing with a studio or anything to actually record things. Even though it does have a record feature in them most of them .So this is like a full package for your kid.

It has everything that you need. A lot of fun things our Casio CTK- 2550 has more sounds and stuff and has a better quality sound than the other one. And then our Alesis Recital 88 Key over here has a full keyboard 88 keys and it has semi weighted keys. So those are the main differences. You either have full keys .Fun sounds and stuff or the whole package of things. Once again these are base price. This is 109 The other one is 100 That full keyboard is only like 200. These are really good prices. If you were given a used piano. It would cost you $100 just to get it tuned if your lucky.

So giving this to your kid is a great way to practice. And they will always have a nice instrument for them to play around with. Ok so we looked at those three instruments I hope you really enjoyed that and learned a lot from it and feel better informed about buying an instrument. Especially about the lies that people are going to tell you.

Because people will criticize your instrument no matter what you get .Sorry about that people are idiots.

Some of the links within this post are affiliate links of which I receive a small compensation from sales of certain items.

As found on Youtube

How to Teach Piano to a 5 year old

 

I recall the first time I took my children to piano music lessons in Brisbane Australia my son daughter were just turning 6 and 5 respectfully. As parents on a Saturday morning it was packed with us young parents who were their support and cheer them on. The lessons were a group session it was way to full with a dozen beginner kids who at best were probably confused with the teacher trying shout over them and percussion instruments rattling in the background.

I recall my early lesson was one on one and I really had a great teacher that help me place my hand on the white keys ever so gently getting me to press each note with my thumb then followed by other fingers on my right hand. The enormity of the piano with my legs dangling over a proper piano stool was overwhelming because we had an old wooden stool at home on our old piano.But later we got a great adjustable piano stool as this becomes really important for your posture

Later on when I started my first music school in Woodridge QLD Australia the majority were Polynesians children and the group lessons were the best times I had teaching them after school. I was able to secure some old computers and purchase some software where they went through some musical theory whilst we had piano and vocal lessons going.

How to teach Piano to 5 year old |The same concept of fun was a Paramount as the students responded lots of games and cards picture board games and even bit of bulrush outside.

Most 5 year old Students experience sound before the symbol or name of the sound is even defined. After students discover what it feels like to play the sound and learning the technique needed to produce the sound, they then learn the symbol and finally the name for the sound. So I approach new concepts with most students (but especially young ones) with a sound-feel-symbol-name sequence.

Frances Clark teaching for early childhood piano are a great resource especially for older students.

Keyboard Musician for the Adult Beginner (Frances Clark Library Supplement)

Here is a complete repertoire and textbook for the older or adult beginner. Starting with material appropriate for the first lesson, it moves rapidly through discoveries, music and activities equivalent to The Music Tree and Levels 1 and 2. On completing the book, the student is ready for Level 3 of the Clark Library. The book provides quantities of music, all of it selected or composed to appeal to the older student — Studies (introducing each of 65 new subjects), Repertoire (155 solos and duets), Accompanying and Transposing (62 melodies to accompany and to transpose to all major and minor keys), Sight Reading (107 one-line pieces that review each of the new discoveries and teach sight reading skills). In addition, the 22 units in 208 pages include: Technical Exercises, Rhythm Exercises, Written Work and Improvising. A Glossary at the end defines all new signs and terms introduced throughout the book.

The Music Tree Activities Book: Time to Begin

Initially assessing their musical ability is the first step in identifying where to start with your students.

  • 2 black keys and 3 black keys can they see the pattern on the piano if not I use easy rote pieces around to help them navigate around the piano, such as those found in the wonderful Piano Safari and Roadtrip! books.
  • Can they hear the pitch
  • Can sing or vocalize what I sing
  • Finger movement

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GAMES

High or Low

Loud or Short

Same or different

Happy or sad

Funny

Sounds like

Tap me a note- Fingers 1 & 2 on the left hand and the right hand

copy me

Having fun and affirming without correcting them at this stage and then we may do abit of singing.

Some may have a perfect pitch others may not have it yet but having them sing along with me is important rather than the piano.

Remember Fun Appropriate and a Beaming Face when they leave is what we want.

Here we explore their first aural assesment and see whether as a teacher we can build our student aural skills.

Can they sing back the note and whether it is high or low .

You can use pitch awareness by asking them do they have a favorite song and if they are brave enough to sing abit for you.Watch there dixterity hand and finger movement at 5 some have a grip of a 7 year old and others are still grasping crayons in a fist shape.

This is why we tap it out. I get them tapping individual fingers on a table or closed piano lid. Call out “finger 2!” and demonstrate tapping this finger independently.

As with everything else here, this needs to be adapted to have a positive experience. Fingers 1 & 2 could be enough for the first day. Or, you might be able to utilise all the fingers, and specify which hand to use.

Hearing the pulse jumping marching and don’t worry about the rhythm but as 5 year olds we just to access there gross motor skills first.

Come back to piano and play game of navigate around

“Let’s play only white keys.”, or “Let’s use only three black key groups this time.” can prompt exploration and understanding of the keyboard geography.

There are definitely more things I’m paying attention to in my first interactions with a child. These are just the key musical abilities that I want to assess. The reason for choosing these particular ones is that they are the most common stumbling blocks for students this age.

Right now, all over the world, piano students are wasting precious practice time. And piano teachers are straining valuable vocal chords telling them to practice more. It’s time to reexamine this setup, and cure the underlying piano practice ailments.

“A must-read for every piano teacher, The Piano Practice Physician’s Handbook is full of practical advice you can start using with your students today! Follow the prescriptions and your studio will be full of musicians with healthy practice habits.”

Hi. Welcome to The Piano Podcast. I’m Mario Ajero.

In this video, I want to show some piano pieces that you could teach to young preschool children as young as age three to prepare them for traditional piano lessons.

I’m hoping this video is useful to both professional piano teachers as well as parents who just want to give their young children a head start on piano lessons.

One of the first activities that you can actually do at the keyboard is to teach your kids that the piano consists of two black keys and three black keys.

Can you play two black keys like this?

Once children can find the two black keys, you can do short rhythmic patterns alternating between the two black keys like this one.

I use braced second fingers like this because most kids around the age of three don’t have the individual finger control yet to use multiple fingers.
So don’t rush that part in these initial learning stages.

After they can repeat after you, make sure they can play in the different octaves of the keyboard.

This introduces them to transposing and establishes a physical and aural connection between the other parts of the keyboard.

After that, move on to the groups of three Black Keys you might want to start with just simple up and down patterns

But hot cross buns is probably the most accessible piece on three Black Keys as it has no it’s going down and groups of repeated notes going up

After they’ve mastered it on three Black Keys challenge them to move it on to other sets of three keys like be b,a,g right next to it

Transposing to other key areas reinforces the intervallic relationships between notes in music

Which is probably more important than learning the individual notes themselves

To other easy key areas are the notes E,D,C groups

and even the be excuse me d sharp C sharp B groups

Oh mary had a little lamb is another familiar tune that’s a little bit more complex to teach because it has more changes in direction than hot cross buns

Teach it in small phrases that the young student can master first and then piece it all together 4:51

Moving students to tunes that spanned more than just the three Black Keys is easy with tunes like the first part of Old MacDonald

From there you can move too familiar tunes that have jumps of like a fifth in it like twinkle twinkle little star

Let the child use both hands so that he or she can more easily find the jump like this

as you can tell i like to play a little confidence along with the young child

This acts as a motivator to have the child feel like he or she is part of a larger and fuller sounding piece of music

Also it helps the child get a stronger sense of pulse and rhythm they can simply be coral a conference that go back and forth between tonic dominant and subdominant harmonies

If the child has an older sibling that place piano then it’s a wonderful opportunity to put them together for duet playing

Such as this rendition of happy birthday performed by Olivia come accompanied by her brother neo

Parents who are interested in introducing these activities for their young children to start playing piano make it a regular part of their your family everyday activities

For example i started all my children with playing the piano a little bit after dinner each time and just became a regular occurrence something that was expected of the children

Try to always be encouraging and positive with your comments towards them and the attitude towards playing the piano

However try to resist the temptation to bribe them with external incentives or rewards anything like that they’re

The music itself should act as the incentive if they actually do well and succeed at it that’s going to be enough motivation for them to continue and excel at the piano playing and in future lessons

As found on Youtube

Videos devoted to the piano and piano pedagogy. Include piano lessons, performances, and interviews. ‘Like’ The Piano Podcast on Facebook.

 

You can also find The Piano Podcast on iTunes and at: http://marioajero.blogspot.com

The Piano Practice Physician’s Handbook

 

The Piano Practice Physician’s Handbook takes a fresh look at how piano teachers teach practice skills. These 32 piano student ailments and their cures open up new ways of thinking about piano practice problems.

Learn to Play Piano Lesson 1: How to Read Music|Joyfully

How can I learn to play piano by myself

 

Welcome now to the very first assignment in the Do-It-Yourself Learn to Play Piano series. Today we’re just going to be talking about some exceedingly preparatory subjects to get you started, for those of us who might not have that melodic or musical background.

My memories of learning was listening to my uncles play the piano at church and observing how kids at my age 7 years were going to piano lessons.Up to then i had a learnt a few tunes at home by myself but getting my family members teach but the first step is getting a piano or keyboard at home.

I was excited when I went to my first piano lesson and I met allot of my school/church friends there.

The first lessons books I was given were

The Leila Fletcher Piano Course, Book 1

Dozen A Day

I continued to used all the other series book 1 to book 6 with classical training through the grades of Trinity and Royal Schools Of music.But these early years of learning sit on the piano and later learning the proper techniques of hand position all started from being comfortable of playing around.

The notes being weighted can be difficult if you are young  now these days with guided LED lights on the keyboard you can learn very quickly on a The One Smart Piano  

A piano that teaches you to play!

The ONE Smart Piano teaches you to play your first song in minutes!

The ONE brings the world’s first and only upright, Apple MFI-certified digital piano integrated with technology that facilitates self-instruction.

 

 

How To Read The Notes

What we’re gonna principally be talking about today is how to learn how to read music on the staff, and what the staff is all about. So, with that enunciated, let’s get started shall we?

All notes are here, so here we have the musical staff. An important thing be informed about the melodic notes is that it’s made up of five notes on the line: one, two, three, four and five.

And four notes in the spaces: one, two, three and four.

Now another important thing to know is that our notes are able to fall on a line or a space, and is dependent on which of these lines or space, will tell you what to observe to play it and where on the keyboard to play that note.

Now in a few seconds I’ll show you how to read  all the notes on all staff member Treble and Bass Staff

All right, so before I teach you how to read those notes on all staff members, I’d like to point out two immediate occasions.

The first thing is this one, this be the treble clef mark. The treble clef is usually played with the right hand,

If you think about it the right hand on the keyboard is generally played up at the higher purpose of the keyboard where the indicates higher in pitching are located, thus the word treble clef.

And the next one I want to show you be the bass clef.

The bass clef is often played with the left hand down on the lower end of the forte-piano, thus the appointed name bass clef.

All right, so now I’m going to teach you how to read tones on all staff members. And the easiest method I’ve found to do this is to memorize both the lines and spaces for both the treble clef and the bass clef.

Now depending on which clef you’re talking about, the lines and spaces will be slightly different. So it’s important to memorize the lines and spaces for both clefs.

So for the treble clef, the lines of the treble clef are: E, G, B, D and F.

Now I’ve come up with a little saying that might help you out with memorizing this, and it’s,

Every Good Bunny Deserves Fudge.

Now the first word of each of these oaths will tell you the lines of the treble clef. So, E for Every, G for Good, B for Bunny, D for Deserves and F for Fudge.

So, E, G, B, D and F.

Now we’ll talk about the gaps/spaces of the treble clef.

The notes of the treble clef are: F, A, C and E. Now I don’t have a speaking to memorize this one, only because this one going to happen to trance a certain word.

And of course that message is FACE. So again, F, A, C and E. Now you can feel free to pause this video at any time to look this over and perhaps write it down to memorize it.

Bass Clef

And next we’ll talk about the lines and gaps of the bass clef. OK, so now we have the lines and spaces of the bass clef. An important thing I envisioned I should mention, that I forgot to mention in the previous division, was that whenever you’re trying to figure out the lines or cavities for a clef, that you want to be counting from the bottom of the staff to the top of the staff.

So, we have, for the lines of the bass clef: G, B, D, F, and A. Or as I like to say, Good Bunnies Deserve Fudge Always. So, G for Good, B for Bunnies, D for Deserve, F for Fudge, and A for Always.

Now we’ll be talking here about the spaces of the bass clef.

The rooms of the bass clef are A, C, E and G. Or, All Cows Eat Grass. And remember that whenever we’re trying to figure out the lines and spaces, we’re always going to be weighing from the bottom to the top of the staff.

If you do it the other way round, unfortunately you’ll get the bad tones. So I thought that was an important thing to mention. So there you have it, that be the lines and openings of the treble and bass clef.

All right, so here we have the melodic alphabet. Another fairly easy subject to understand but it is important to know.

The musical alphabet

The musical alphabet starts with A, and be applicable to G, and then it reiterates.

So, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B,

and then it would keep going C, D, E, F, G, A.

So you might just wanna practice knowing what the melodic alphabet is. A to G, and then it echoes. You too want to practice saying it backwards.

Now I’ll explain why this is once we start playing on the forte-piano a little down below more.

So you want to be able to go: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, A, G, F, E, D, C, B, A.

So when you’re learning to dallied the forte-piano, you will be an ultimate professional at the first seven letters of the alphabet, forwards and backwards. So, like I suggested, an easy subject to understand, but it is definitely worth knowing about.

All right, so we have thus concluded our very first instruction. A speedy review of things we talked about in this lesson: The first thing we talked about was the musical staff and that the musical organization, if you recollect, is made up of five lines and four spaces in between those staff lines.

And depending on which way or playing a notes falls on will tell you which character notation to represent, and where on the piano to play it.

We too talked about the treble clef and bass clef, and how to read specific tones depending on which clef you’re talking about, by memorizing the lines and rooms for each.

 


 

As found on Youtube